Teaching on the sly

When I first arrived at Stellenbosch University, I was a bit concerned.  I had thoroughly enjoyed organizing my own semester-long class in bioinformatics for M.Sc. and Ph.D. students at Vanderbilt University.  Under the “British System,” though, students encounter their final classes in the “Honours” year, crammed between the three-year Bachelor’s program and the two-year Master’s program.  Interestingly, a student may attend Honours at a different college than where he or she completed a bachelor’s degree, and the student may go to yet another university for a Master of Science after the Honours, so long as the training is judged to be relevant.

Overview of South African education program

This sequence describes the common route through South African education, from kindergarten to a terminal degree.

I would take a moment to explain a couple of important features here.  In South Africa, students are required to complete only the first nine grades, called “General Education and Training.”  In the United States, graduation from high school means that you have met your high school’s requirements for that goal (which in turn must meet state requirements).  In South Africa, however, high schools essentially serve to prepare students to take the “matric” exams, which are set (created) and marked (graded) nationally.  Matric successes or failures are what decide a student’s opportunities going forward.  I should also say that the chart above describes the academic track.  Many students take advantage of TVET (Technical and Vocational Education and Training) schools that lead to a certificate or diploma rather than a degree (these campuses have also experienced significant protests).  Each of these training types is considered in determining the SAQA level for a job candidate.

IMG_7451

The 2016 Honours class for the Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics

Students who come to Honours in the Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics (MBHG) may come from quite a variety of schools and backgrounds.  Like other divisions throughout Stellenbosch University and the University of Cape Town, we are trying to “transform,” or more faithfully represent the broader population of South Africa, and so we seek out candidates who may not have been able to afford the best schools for bachelor’s training.  Transformation is a hard task, and many universities are struggling [Note to self: read that overview chapter!].

My first exposure to teaching at Stellenbosch, then, was to create a bioinformatics “module” for our Honours students.  The group above got to serve as test subjects for my new curriculum, which spanned just four days in 2016.  Instead of 43 one-hour classes from my old Vanderbilt BMIF 310, I adjusted to four morning laboratories (each three hours) and four afternoon lectures (each two hours).  With so little time, I was obviously quite superficial in my coverage.  For 2017, though,  I will conduct a bioinformatics module that extends for eight days (during the first eight business days of May).  I am keeping the hands-on and lecture split the same as last year.  I think the doubling to eight days will be good for both the students and the professor!

Useful Hour 3

In this still from Useful Hour 3, Haiko, Michael, and I impersonate parts of a linked list.

Lecturing just eight days a year isn’t really satisfying my itch to teach, though.  This year I initiated a wildcat “course” of sorts.  The “Useful Hour” takes place each Wednesday at 1:30 PM.  Anyone on campus can attend, and we record videos each week for those who cannot.  The topics have generally been focused on computers, bioinformatics, or biostatistics, though in the coming week we will branch out into biochemistry, as well.  Since the Useful Hour covers so much terrain, I have tried to treat each segment as an independent story, with the topic for each Wednesday announced by my listserv on Monday.  It could be that the loose structure of the Useful Hour will cause its undoing, but for now I am really enjoying its playful vibe.

My work with the Blackburn Lab at the University of Cape Town on Tuesdays has led to another opportunity.  I have teamed up with Nelson Soares, a staff scientist, to create a monthly “Big Show” tutorial for the community of proteomics researchers throughout Cape Town.  Our recent program gave graduate students and post-docs the opportunity to present the essentials of protein identification and quantitation.  In April, we will look at the opportunities their acquisition of a SCIEX TripleTOF will confer on the group.  I appreciate that the students are also willing to listen to a lecture from me, from time to time!

The very latest teaching gig is one I hesitate to mention, since we are still formulating it.  In talking with more members of the Biotechnology Department at the University of the Western Cape, I’ve realized that they have a critical need for more biostatistics training.  I have never taught this subject formally, though I was part of the weekly “Omics” clinic for Biostatistics at Vanderbilt University for a few years.  Certainly one cannot function for long in genomics, transcriptomics, or proteomics without knowing something about biostatistics.  Teaching biostatistics formally is likely to teach me as much about the subject as the students who attend!  I hoped to use slides from Stellenbosch University for teaching weekly courses at UWC, but I could not get that use approved.  Instead, I have once again borrowed the expertise of my friend Xia Wang at the University of Cincinnati.  I am hopeful that I will be able to understand and use her didactic materials.  They’re written in the LaTeX math formatting language, so I will need to remind myself how to edit and export to a format I can display, like PDF. My last real experience with LaTeX was when I wrote my Ph.D. dissertation in 2003.

With students on three university campuses, I think I will finally feel like I have real some momentum in my teaching!

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